Drumming For Health & Well Being

Drumming affects us physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually in profoundly uplifting ways. This is why people all over the earth have drummed in some manner throughout history.

In the past few years, studies conducted in hospitals and universities (some commissioned by the U.S. Senate and the Veterans Administration!) have documented the health and healing aspects of drumming. Playing drums, whether solo or with a group of people, relieves stress, increases vitality and puts us in the transcendent state of clarity and heightened awareness that psychologist Mikaly Csikszentmihalyi calls Flow, and that athletes refer to as The Zone,  Drummers call this state the Groove.

In fact, drumming is very much like athletics in that in both of these activities we practice movements over and over until they become effortless, powerful and intuitive. In drumming, these movements results in patterns of sounds, that is, rhythms. This repetitive movement and sound relaxes our conscious minds and allows the subconscious mind to guide our movements spontaneously, unencumbered by the conscious mind’s tendency to analyze and control our movements.

One result of this state is the release of stress. Our modern culture is full of many minor, and some not so minor, fears, frustrations and angers. From the inconsiderate drivers who annoy us, or put our lives at risk, on on the highway, to the possibility of being “downsized” out of a job.  We are bombarded by a constant barrage of “fight or flight” stimuli. Our evolution has provided us with the ability to deal with the major, life-threatening conflicts found in nature by putting ourselves through mental and physiological changes that give us short bursts of super-charged energy.

Unfortunately, the constant stream of stresses in today’s modern world leaves us in an almost continuous low-level state of stress. This state saps our energy and self-healing reserves and leaves us vulnerable to physical and mental unwell-being. Drumming, by putting us in an alert, relaxed and powerful state, counteracts this state of fear and anger.

Drumming also gives us physical vitality because it is also a very physical activity. It gets our hearts pounding and our blood flowing. It is a great way to use our bodies, to simply work up a sweat!  Our bodies need, and love, to be used. When we use our bodies properly (relaxing, breathing with the diaphragm, using efficient, natural movements) we are rewarded with increased stamina, strength and flexibility.

Finally, drumming is fun! It’s a great way to feel the pure joy of being alive! Drumming by ourselves allows us to go deeply into our true natures by eliminating distractions and societal constraints. Drumming with other is a universally time-honored way to create a feeling of community and trust. Drumming is simply one of life’s many great gifts!

The Four P’s Of Practicing

Practice is both a verb, to practice a skill (a musical instrument, for example), and a noun, a life-practice (such as Yoga, Meditation, Music, etc.) that reinforces positive Life Rhythms… beneficial patterns of Attitude and Action.  We reinforce both through repetition.  Of course, we want to make sure that we’re repeating the things we want to get good at!

Here are four fundamental elements to build into our life-practices, and into our practicing, to make sure we are reinforcing our positive Life Rhythms… as individuals, and as groups:

1) Purpose:  Have a clear vision of what you want to do.  What are your short-, mid-, and long-term goals?

2) Plan:  Create a routine of specific actions.  Set regular days and times to engage in the activity, and know what you will do during each session.  Your practice will become a regular part of your life, and something to look forward to!

3) Persevere:  Keep to your Purpose and to your Plan.  Every time we break a routine, it becomes easier to break it again, and to feel that we are unreliable… which makes it easier to break it again.  Every time we stay with a productive routine, we reinforce a sense that we are dependable; this makes us want to live up to our dependable nature and engage in the activity again and again!

4) Play:  Have fun… We call it “playing music” for a reason!  Make any and all Practice time into Play time.  As children, we learn by playing.  As adults, we often forget to play because we now have responsibilities, and can feel that playing is wasting time.  Keep playing to keep learning! When we are reinforcing skills, or learning knew ones, we know that we are “practicing”, but when we approach each session with an attitude of, “I’m going to play now”, we create a feeling of eager anticipation. This then reinforces a positive attitude that carries over when when play, at anything, in public or with friends.  For example, I start every day by breathing deeply several times, giving thanks for all of my many Blessings, and telling myself, “I get to PLAY today!”.  This is especially important when I know that some of my day will be spent “playing” in my office to get gigs so I can PLAY for, and with, other people!

Now go play… at something… anything!